Register for the 16th Annual Seacoast Half Marathon to Benefit Cornerstone VNA

Register for the 16th Annual Seacoast Half Marathon to Benefit Cornerstone VNA

 

On October 31st, the 16th Annual Seacoast Half Marathon, one of coastal New Hampshire’s longest running half marathons, will kick off from Portsmouth High School. Traditionally an in-person race, the Seacoast Half Marathon is offering a hybrid model in 2021, giving runners the opportunity to participate either in-person or virtually. Virtual participants can select from three distance options (5k, quarter marathon or half marathon), which can be completed on the route of their choice between October 23rd and October 31st.

 

Each year, 100% of the net proceeds from the event are donated to a mindfully selected seacoast nonprofit organization. This year’s beneficiary, Cornerstone VNA, is an independent nonprofit organization providing home care, hospice, palliative care, private duty services, and community health and wellness programs. As a local health care provider, Cornerstone VNA has been on the frontlines of the COVID-19 pandemic, caring for patients of all ages, from birth through end-of-life.

 

According to Erika Lee, Cornerstone VNA’s Advancement Director, “We are thrilled to be a part of this popular seacoast race, and we are grateful to the Seacoast Half Marathon volunteer race committee for all of their efforts to support local nonprofits like Cornerstone VNA.” Lee adds, “We also appreciate all of our race sponsors, especially Ocean Properties and First Seacoast Bank, who are our lead sponsors this year, and Runner’s Alley for their continued partnership in this event!”

 

According to Bruce Hurley, longtime Seacoast Half Marathon committee member, “Since our race first began in 2006, we have raised over $1.3 million for local nonprofit organizations. It’s a special tradition of caring for the coast and we are proud of the work we’ve done to raise awareness and funds for our nonprofit friends.” Jay Diener, Race Director adds, “This event brings so many people together and I am grateful to everyone involved in making the Seacoast Half Marathon a successful race year after year.”

 

Visit seacoasthalfmarathon.com today to learn more and to register.

 

Cornerstone VNA is a nonprofit organization currently serving Rockingham, Strafford, Belknap and Carroll Counties in New Hampshire and York County in Maine. The team at Cornerstone VNA provides award-winning care and support through five distinct programs: Home Care, Hospice Care, Palliative Care, Life Care-Private Duty and Community Care. For 108 years, Cornerstone VNA has been committed to bringing services to people of all ages so that families can stay together at home, even when facing the challenges of aging, surgical recovery, chronic or life-threatening illnesses or end-of-life care. To learn more about Cornerstone VNA, visit www.cornerstonevna.org or call 800-691-1133.

Portsmouth Halloween Parade 2021

The Annual Portsmouth Halloween Parade 2021 walks, stalks, dances, trumpets and drums its way through downtown Portsmouth on Oct. 31st at 7 p.m. Dress up, gather at Peirce Island and march. No sign-up required. Hundreds march, thousands watch, always a spectacle. The whole schedule can be found at https://www.portsmouthhalloweenparade.org/

The History of Maine Railroads

The History of Maine Railroads

 

South Berwick, Maine- Old Berwick Historical Society will present an online lecture on Thursday, October 28 at 7:30pm about the history of railroads in Maine. One of the first states to build railroads and trolleys in the United States, Maine at one point had more than ninety communities with trolleys. From an international electric trolley to the attempted World War I dynamiting of a railroad bridge between the United States and Canada, historian Bill Kenny will talk about why the state is home to a rich rail heritage.

 

Participants can register for the online lecture through the Old Berwick Historical Society’s website. Admission is free to members, with a $5 suggested donation for non-members. The lecture is open to the public.

 

Bill Kenny is a retired United States Air Force officer, with a career of a logistics war planner and military intelligence officer. Kenny has twenty years of experience as an adjunct university professor of International Economics, Organizational Leadership, Project Management, and Foreign Affairs. He has written two books, A History of Maine Railroads, and his second book, co-authored with his wife, Kathy, Historic Taverns and Tea Rooms of Maine, which was released in May.

 

The Counting House Museum is open Saturdays form 1-4pm through the end of October and by appointment anytime. The Old Berwick Historical Society’s 2021 lectures are generously sponsored by Kennebunk Savings and supported by historical society members and donors. More information is available by calling 207-384-0000 or at  www.oldberwick.org.

 

PLAINS SPEAKING: The Portsmouth Raid in Fact & Fiction

PLAINS SPEAKING: The Portsmouth Raid in Fact & Fiction

October 15 – 17 Live Presentation / October 24 Online Zoom Presentation

 

Pontine Theatre presents the premiere of Plains Speaking: The Portsmouth Raid in Fact and Fiction, a video production exploring the history and legacy of the raid that occurred on the Portsmouth Plains on June 26, 1696. The video was researched, written and presented by Consulting Curator, Nina Maurer.  

 

Pontine’s present home at the 1845 Plains Schoolhouse is located on the site of the raid. Our community’s longstanding interest in place-based history and historic preservation gave rise to the development of this video which examines this important and overlooked part of Portsmouth’s history.  

Presentations of the video with live commentary and discussion with Nina Maurer, will take place at Pontine’s 1845 Plains Schoolhouse theatre October 15 -17.  Due to COVID19 precatutions seating is extremely limited.  The following Sunday 24 October @2pm the presentation will be available online via the Zoom platform.  Tickets for the online presentations are available at Pontine’s website:  www.pontine.org  To be placed on a waiting list to attend one of the live presentations, contact Pontine Theatre via email  info@pontine.org.  Live performances take place at the 1845 Plains Schoolhouse, #1 Plains Avenue, Portsmouth NH.   

A New Hampshire State Marker (#75), located at the Portsmouth Plains, reads, “In the pre-dawn hours of June 26, 1696, Indians attacked the settlement here. Fourteen persons were killed and others taken captive. Five houses and nine barns were burned.” In fact, there are scant historical records documenting the facts of this event and the veracity of accounts given in local sources, such as Brewster’s Rambles About Portsmouth (1859), has been challenged by local historians. Little progress has been made in understanding or to finding a context for this dramatic event,

Forgotten Frontiers, an exhibit, curated by Ms. Maurer, and mounted at the Counting House Museum in South Berwick, Maine, has provided scholarship that sheds light on the raid at the Portsmouth Plains.  That exhibit has articulated a meaningful connection among a series of attacks that took place here in the Piscataqua region in the late 17th century, including the Cocheco Massacre at Dover Point (1689); the Salmon Falls Raid at South Berwick (1690); and attacks at Sandy Beach (1691), York (1692), Oyster River (1694) and Portsmouth Plains (1696). 

Tracing historical forces in operation at that time reveals motivations and circumstances that fueled an increase in aggression and conflict between the Wabanaki people and the area’s colonial settlers. Plains Speaking, elucidates  the facts of the raid increasing public understanding of the cultural conflict underlying the raid. This program is designed to expand appreciation of the multiple viewpoints inherent in the conflict and to explore the legacy of colonial conflict for Seacoast residents today.

Pontine Theatre is supported by grants from the National Endowment for the Arts, and the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts.  Research for Plains Speaking was partially supported by a grant from New Hampshire Humanities.  

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